Housing Typology Case Studies

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First published in 2016 these housing typology case studies illustrate where architects and urban designers have reconciled functions of the individual house that are integral to placemaking across seven groupings:

The Terrace

This piece explores the terraced house format through recent practiceexamples. As the first of seven in a housing typologies series it looks at
the role of the contemporary terraced house in urban and rural settings. Illustrated by mapping, photography and scale drawings, our aim is to show the linkage between design of the house and the place of which it forms apart.

Terraced housing is seen throughout the urban and rural landscapes of Scotland in both indigenous and contemporary housing. Combining economy with climatic resilience it continues as a form that adapts well to policy objectives for energy performance, townscape and placemaking.

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Clusters, Groupings and Courtyards

This piece explores a sample of housing formed around courtyards, into clusters, or otherwise composed as groups. This second of seven in our typologies series looks at the role of contemporary grouped forms of housing in urban and rural settings. Illustrated by mapping, photography and scale drawings, our aim is to show the linkage between design of the house and the place of which it forms a part.

The farm steading and urban court continue to provide models for composing and grouping contemporary housing. These are tried and tested adaptations to Scottish social, climatic and topographic conditions, whether in urban, coastal or rural contexts. Combining shelter and enclosure with common outdoor space; housing in clusters can contribute to meeting local policy objectives for townscape and sustainable design.

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Closes, Wynds and Mews

This piece looks at the role of contemporary closes, wynds and mews, re-interpretations of Scottish urban forms. Our aim is to show the linkage between design of the house and the place of which it forms a part.

In urban Scotland, closes and wynds emerged behind the market street as the narrow routes between plots of land. These slender routes, with their closely-bound adjoining buildings and boundary walls, form a distinctive Scottish typology. In later Georgian streets mews had a similar function of providing the infrastructure to Georgian townhouses, with mews now re-appropriated for compact urban living. Such ancillary streets and lanes are often the interstices between busy streets and blocks of terraced townhouses. Surviving examples have proved adaptable and conducive to a mix of uses.

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Edge

This piece explores a sample of housing forming edges to parks, public open space and the wider landscape. This fourth of seven in our typologies series explores buildings at the edge in Scottish urban and rural landscapes. Illustrated by mapping, photography and scale drawings, our aim is to show the linkage between design of the house and the place of which it forms a part.

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Towers, Corners and Markers

A sample of individual buildings with a role in the wider landscape ortownscape. This fifth of seven in our typologies series looks at the role
of towers, corners and markers in the Scottish landscape. Illustrated by mapping, photography and scale drawings, our aim is to show the linkagebetween design of the house and the place of which it forms a part.

From the tower house to craggy skylines and the Kirk, built form in Scotland includes many landmark buildings; whether marked out against the background of other buildings or the landscape, by their scale and distinctive detail, or responding imaginatively to the quirks of Scottish topography andvisual context. Such landmarks create diversity and incident in the visual townscape, contributing to the ‘legibility’ of local streets.

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Topographic and Climate Responses

This piece explores a sample of housing responding to site-specific local conditions such as topography, flooding or micro-climate. This sixth of seven in our typologies series illustrates responses to steep topography, high rainfalland sunlight. Illustrated by mapping, photography and scale drawings, our aim is to show the linkage between design of the house and the place of which it forms a part.

Sloping land, wind, rainfall and a precious low winter sun, are just a few of the distinctive characteristics influencing the siting and design of housing in Scotland.

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Adaptables

This piece explores a sample of housing with more than one face and use. With current policy seeking adaptability in the design of new housing we look at examples allowing potential for the home to accommodate change and different uses in a number of ways. Illustrated by mapping, photography and scale drawings, our aim is to show the linkage between design of the house and the place of which it forms a part.

Such housing can provide longer-term value and mixed use neighbourhoods, allowing lifestyle changes to be accommodated, more sustainable working patterns and less reliance on the car.

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Page Updated: July 2019

Cover Image: Tigh na Cladach by Gokay Deveci – Image by Andrew Lee

Housing Typologies: Edge

This piece explores a sample of housing forming edges to parks, public open space and the wider landscape.

The Place Standard Case Studies

This series of case studies from A&DS illustrates how the Place Standard tool has been used in a variety of ways.

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