Primary Care Reference Design Project

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Quality and Efficiency: Value for money lessons and performance measures from the Primary Care Reference Design Project

records the good practice developed through a design study funded by the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorate, chaired by the Scottish Futures Trust, and delivered through Hub West Scotland.

In the study, two architecture practices – BDP and Gareth Hoskins Architects – were tasked with developing creative responses to the new integrated social and health care agenda: solutions which would meet the expectations of the Quality Strategy and the Policy on Design Quality for NHSScotland, were efficient, affordable and deliverable in a real context. Concepts were developed through focused and intensive engagement with the client team and wider stakeholders for a project being commissioned by East Renfrewshire Community Health and Care Partnership (East Renfrewshire Council and NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde).

The process was supported by Health Facilities Scotland, and the above named organisations, to allow wider lessons to be captured to help future clients for similar facilities across Scotland. The publication includes:
• Design Lessons: replicable ideas and elements from the designs to support briefing and appraisal of future projects.
• Process Lessons: learning from the streamlined appointment procedure adopted, and the methods of engagement with stakeholders.
• Performance Measures: establishing area and financial benchmarks for similar developments to aid clients in assessing value for money.

Through clever design, the intelligent use of space, and the development of attractive and supportive working areas, the teams were able to reduce the total area of the building and gain the stakeholders’ confidence that the proposal would work for them. It is estimated that the savings realised through the intelligent use of design are approximately £900,000 in construction costs (more than 22x the design fee to develop the building concept)*, which in terms of the revenue funding of the development equates to approximately £2.5m.

The project demonstrates the tangible benefits of effective stakeholder engagement, joint working and a design led approach. As such it is an example of the type of good practice advocated in “Creating Places”, Scotland’s new architecture and place policy statement (launched 24 June 2013).

The client group have elected to adopt the concept developed by Gareth Hoskins Architects and are progressing that currently. Both the process of the study and the resultant designs have been well received, with one of the GPs commenting:

I found the process enlightening, informative and interesting – it seemed the architects had a real desire to understand how GPs work, and how the design of the building could compliment this whilst providing a positive experience for staff and patients. Ideas, concerns and expectations were incorporated and the final concept exceeded my expectations.

* cost base 4Q 2012, fees to stage C only.

Links to relevant organisations:

Scottish Futures Trust, Health Facilities Scotland, Hub West Scotland, East Renfrewshire CHCP, East Renfrewshire Council, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Gareth Hoskins Architects, Building Design Partnership

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