Three questions for Naomi Rubbra – winner of A&DS and RIAS Student Awards in 2017

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Naomi Rubbra, Edinburgh School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, recently won the A&DS Award for Best 3rd Year Student and A&DS Sustainable Design Award for her project Material Explorations and Material Tectonics, Chile’s Atacama Desert and Edinburgh City.

How do you feel about winning the award?

Naomi Rubbra: To win one category was sensational, but two, completely dumbfounded. The nominations give hope to the future of urban living, and quells any inhibition moving forwards.

What are your plans for the future?

NR: The immediate future brings an opportunity to study and live in London. I hope to continue on my path toward sustainable urban living infrastructure throughout my masters. A new city will bring new relationships, a different economic and political climate, and an opportunity to work in one of Britain’s leading territories of households in temporary accommodation or homelessness.

Eventually I would like to be a part of a multidisciplinary team, involving designers, geographers and politicians, to actively change what currently stands as a remotely ‘outside-in’ approach of the profession to building in cities. I increasingly believe successful architecture as being deep rooted in the community in which investment is being applied, and a balance comes to light in order to do this, i.e. work with and for community – ‘inside-out’.

What advice would you give to anyone thinking about studying architecture?

NR: Spend time whilst at school to be among a team, to work hard together toward a given finish line. I believe stamina is an important trait in the world of architecture, at the end of the day university teaches you to draw, to communicate, to take criticism, but stamina – to keep working at your idea – is something you can begin to learn early on. At school, alongside your friends and family, push-hard and take care in everything that comes your way.

 

I increasingly believe successful architecture as being deep rooted in the community in which investment is being applied, and a balance comes to light in order to do this, i.e. work with and for community – ‘inside-out’.

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City

Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody only because, and only when, they are created by everybody - Jane Jacobs.

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